Parental experiential avoidance as a potential mechanism of change in a parenting intervention for parents of children with pediatric acquired brain injury

Brown, Felicity L., Whittingham, Koa and Sofronoff, Kate (2015) Parental experiential avoidance as a potential mechanism of change in a parenting intervention for parents of children with pediatric acquired brain injury. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 40 4: 464-474. doi:10.1093/jpepsy/jsu109


Author Brown, Felicity L.
Whittingham, Koa
Sofronoff, Kate
Title Parental experiential avoidance as a potential mechanism of change in a parenting intervention for parents of children with pediatric acquired brain injury
Journal name Journal of Pediatric Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0146-8693
1465-735X
Publication date 2015-05-04
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/jpepsy/jsu109
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 40
Issue 4
Start page 464
End page 474
Total pages 11
Place of publication Oxford University Press
Publisher Oxford, United Kingdom
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective To consider the relationship of parental experiential avoidance (EA) to psychological symptoms and problematic parenting strategies after pediatric acquired brain injury (ABI). Methods Using available data from a randomized controlled trial of a group-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) workshop plus a behavioral family intervention (BFI) for parents of children with ABI (n = 59), correlational and mediational analyses were conducted to consider the role of parental EA as a process of change for parent outcomes. Results Parent EA positively correlated with ineffective parenting behaviors and levels of psychological distress, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Reductions in EA mediated the treatment effect on reducing ineffective parenting behaviors and parent distress, but issues of temporality were present. Conclusions EA is related to parent outcomes following pediatric ABI. A larger and methodologically rigorous study is called for to further elucidate this finding and specifically determine the benefits of targeting EA with interventions such as ACT, in conjunction with evidence-based BFIs.
Keyword Acceptance and commitment therapy
Acquired brain injury
Family
Parent
Parenting interventions
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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