Why don’t smokers want help to quit? A qualitative study of smokers’ attitudes towards assisted versus unassisted quitting

Morphett, Kylie, Partridge, Brad, Gartner, Coral, Carter, Adrian and Hall, Wayne (2015) Why don’t smokers want help to quit? A qualitative study of smokers’ attitudes towards assisted versus unassisted quitting. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 12 6: 6591-6607. doi:10.3390/ijerph120606591

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Author Morphett, Kylie
Partridge, Brad
Gartner, Coral
Carter, Adrian
Hall, Wayne
Title Why don’t smokers want help to quit? A qualitative study of smokers’ attitudes towards assisted versus unassisted quitting
Journal name International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1660-4601
Publication date 2015-06-10
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3390/ijerph120606591
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 12
Issue 6
Start page 6591
End page 6607
Total pages 17
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher M D P I AG
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The development of prescription medication for smoking cessation and the introduction of evidence-based guidelines for health professionals has increasingly medicalised smoking cessation. There are debates about whether medicalisation is a positive development, or whether it has devalued unassisted quitting. In this debate the views of smokers have been neglected. This study explored the attitudes of smokers towards a range of quitting methods, and their considerations when judging their value. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 29 smokers and analysed data using thematic analysis. The results show that the perceived nature of an individual smoker’s addiction was central to judgments about the value of pharmacological cessation aids, as was personal experience with a method, and how well it was judged to align with an individual’s situation and personality. Unassisted quitting was often described as the best method. Negative views of pharmacological cessation aids were frequently expressed, particularly concerns about side effects from prescription medications. Smokers’ views about the value of different methods were not independent: attitudes about cessation aids were shaped by positive attitudes towards unassisted quitting. Examining smokers’ attitudes towards either assisted or unassisted quitting in isolation provides incomplete information on quitting preferences
Keyword Smoking
Smoking cessation
Medicalization
Attitude
Qualitative research
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 12 Jun 2015, 23:38:29 EST by Coral Gartner on behalf of School of Public Health