Perceived Temporal Duration as a Function of Object Magnitude: Sensory or Decisional Processes?

Mitchell, Hannah (2014). Perceived Temporal Duration as a Function of Object Magnitude: Sensory or Decisional Processes? Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Mitchell, Hannah
Thesis Title Perceived Temporal Duration as a Function of Object Magnitude: Sensory or Decisional Processes?
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-06-11
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Philip Grove
Total pages 56
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Previous studies have suggested commonality between the mental processing of temporal magnitude and size magnitude. Supporting this association is the claim that larger stimuli are reported as having longer duration. Yet it is unclear whether this effect occurs because larger stimuli are actually perceived for longer or simply judged as having longer duration due to decisional bias. This study addressed this issue by having participants distinguish between short and long durations of consistent and inconsistent stimuli and examining their sensitivity (d’) and their decision-making criterion (c). It was predicted that if the effect is purely perceptual, sensitivity would be higher for the consistent pairings, but criterion would be unchanged. Conversely, if the effect is purely decisional, it was predicted that there would be a change in criterion as a function of consistency between duration and stimulus size, but no change in sensitivity. If the effect is a combination of perceptual and decisional processes, it was predicted sensitivity and criterion would both change accordingly, as a function of the consistency between duration and stimulus size. This study failed to replicate the finding that larger stimuli are observed for longer, and no significant difference was found between consistent and inconsistent stimuli for sensitivity or criterion. Implications and directions for further research are discussed.
Keyword Decision-making
Cognition
Decisional bias

 
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Created: Thu, 11 Jun 2015, 11:38:36 EST by Louise Grainger on behalf of School of Psychology