Factors associated with triage assignment of emergency department patients ultimately diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction

Ryan, Kimberley, Greenslade, Jaimi, Dalton, Emily, Chu, Kevin, Brown, Anthony F. T. and Cullen, Louise (2015) Factors associated with triage assignment of emergency department patients ultimately diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Australian Critical Care, 29 1: 23-26. doi:10.1016/j.aucc.2015.05.001


Author Ryan, Kimberley
Greenslade, Jaimi
Dalton, Emily
Chu, Kevin
Brown, Anthony F. T.
Cullen, Louise
Title Factors associated with triage assignment of emergency department patients ultimately diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction
Journal name Australian Critical Care   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1036-7314
1878-1721
Publication date 2015-10-19
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.aucc.2015.05.001
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 29
Issue 1
Start page 23
End page 26
Total pages 4
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Elsevier Ireland
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: The objective of this study was to explore factors associated with the triage category assigned by the triage nurse for patients ultimately diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction.

Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of 12 months of data, on adult emergency department patients ultimately diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Data were obtained from hospital databases and included patient demographics, patient clinical characteristics and nurses’ experience.

Results: Of the 153 patients, 20% (95% CI: 14–27%) were given a lower urgency triage category than recommended by international guidelines. Compared to patients who were triaged Australasian Triage Category 1 or 2, patients with an Australasian Triage Category 3–5 were older (mean age 76 versus 68 years), more likely to be female (63% versus 32%), more likely to present without chest pain (93% versus 35%) and less likely to have a cardiac history (3.3% versus 17.9%). A slightly higher proportion of patients Australasian Triage Category 3–5 were triaged by an experienced nurse (50%) compared to patients categorised Australasian Triage Category 1–2 (35.2%) but this finding did not reach statistical significance.

Conclusions: One in five presentations was given a lower urgency triage category than recommended by international guidelines, potentially leading to delays in medical treatment. The absence of chest pain was the defining characteristic in this group of patients, along with other factors identified by previous research such as being of female sex and elderly.
Keyword Chest pain
Emergency department
Emergency nursing
Myocardial infarction
Triage
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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