Oral mucosal disease in an Australian urban Indigenous community using autofluorescence imaging and reflectance spectroscopy

Lalla, Y., Matias, M. A. T. and Farah, C. S. (2015) Oral mucosal disease in an Australian urban Indigenous community using autofluorescence imaging and reflectance spectroscopy. Australian Dental Journal, 60 2: 216-224. doi:10.1111/adj.12320


Author Lalla, Y.
Matias, M. A. T.
Farah, C. S.
Title Oral mucosal disease in an Australian urban Indigenous community using autofluorescence imaging and reflectance spectroscopy
Journal name Australian Dental Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1834-7819
0045-0421
Publication date 2015-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/adj.12320
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 60
Issue 2
Start page 216
End page 224
Total pages 9
Place of publication Chichester, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: The aim of this study was to document the oral mucosal burden in an urban Indigenous community and to evaluate the efficacy of an adjunctive optical device (Identafi™) in a general dental practice.

Methods: Three hundred and forty-two patients who presented to an urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service (ATSICHS) were examined using conventional oral examination (COE) and with a multispectral device (Identafi™). Loss of autofluorescence (LAF) and the visibility of diffuse vasculature were noted.

Results: The urban Indigenous community assessed did not display significantly higher rates of smoking, alcohol consumption or lesion prevalence compared to non-Indigenous counterparts. The white and violet light functions of Identafi™ provided excellent lesion visibility in 84.5% and 77.9% of cases respectively compared to 75% with COE, and were capable of highlighting new lesions not seen during COE.

Conclusions: The urban Indigenous community does not appear to display a significantly higher prevalence of risk factors such as smoking and alcohol consumption compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts living in the same region, nor are they more likely to have oral mucosal lesions. The incidence of intraoral pigmentation has the potential to complicate use of autofluorescence screening devices, emphasizing the importance of skill and training when using this technology.
Keyword Autofluorescence imaging
Early detection of cancer
Identafiā„¢
Indigenous health
Mucosal disease
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2016 Collection
 
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