Age, period, and cohort effects on migration of the baby boomers in Australia

Sander, Nikola and Bell, Martin (2015) Age, period, and cohort effects on migration of the baby boomers in Australia. Population, Space and Place, 1-14. doi:10.1002/psp.1948

Author Sander, Nikola
Bell, Martin
Title Age, period, and cohort effects on migration of the baby boomers in Australia
Journal name Population, Space and Place   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1544-8452
Publication date 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/psp.1948
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract The distinctive migration behaviour of the baby boom generation is commonly attributed to cohort size effects, but evidence to date has been drawn primarily from the US context. This paper focuses on inter-cohort differences in the intensity and pattern of internal migration in Australia with particular attention to the Australian baby boomer generation as it has moved through the life course. A series of generalised linear models are fitted to migration flows to disentangle the effects of age, period, and birth cohort. The results demonstrate that age exerts the largest effect on migration intensity, with cohort effects playing a secondary role, while the effects of period are more subtle. In contrast of the US, cohort effects are not restricted to the baby boom but show a continuous upwards trend that plateaued briefly as the later baby boomers, born in the early 1960s, entered the labour force during rising unemployment in the 1980s. This divergence is traced to a much smaller demographic bulge created by the baby boom in Australia that was substantially enlarged by overseas migration in the 1960s. The findings underline the context-specific nature of mobility behaviour.
Keyword Australia
Baby boom
Cohort analysis
Internal migration
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Official 2016 Collection
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