Biomass retention and carbon stocks in integrated vegetation bands: A case study of mixed-age brigalow-eucalypt woodland in southern Queensland, Australia

Ryan, Justin G, Fyfe, Christine T and McAlpine, Clive A (2015) Biomass retention and carbon stocks in integrated vegetation bands: A case study of mixed-age brigalow-eucalypt woodland in southern Queensland, Australia. The Rangeland Journal, 37 3: 261-271. doi:10.1071/RJ14023


Author Ryan, Justin G
Fyfe, Christine T
McAlpine, Clive A
Title Biomass retention and carbon stocks in integrated vegetation bands: A case study of mixed-age brigalow-eucalypt woodland in southern Queensland, Australia
Journal name The Rangeland Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1036-9872
1834-7541
Publication date 2015-05-15
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/RJ14023
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 37
Issue 3
Start page 261
End page 271
Total pages 11
Place of publication Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Regrowth of native woody vegetation has the potential to provide an economically valuable source of carbon storage and other ecosystem services. There is a lack of readily applicable examples of how regrowth of forests and woodlands can be integrated with existing grazing production systems and provide soil-protection and water-retention benefits. A system of integrated vegetation bands (IVB) was applied to patchy regrowth of acacia and eucalypt vegetation in a grazed landscape of southern Queensland, Australia. Across a 39.8-ha catchment with 3–5% slope, regrowth of scattered native vegetation (18.4 ha) was surveyed and diameter at breast height and height for all woody plants were recorded. The IVB (6.3 ha) were then marked out as 25-m-wide bands set 100 m apart and offset at ~2–3% gradient to the contour line, retaining the densest/largest regrowth where possible. The data on diameter at breast height and height were analysed using allometric equations to compare aboveground biomass in the original regrowth condition (‘Original’) to that retained in the installed IVB (‘IVB-Riparian’). Estimates of aboveground biomass were calculated for the Original and IVB-Riparian and compared with three other potential regrowth-vegetation management ‘treatments’ in a desktop-modelling study. The models were designated as: (1) ‘Original’; (2) ‘Broad’ (broad-scale cleared with only a few large trees along a creek retained)’; (3) ‘Big Trees’ (only large trees >40 cm diameter at breast height retained); (4) ‘Riparian-IVB (bands of vegetation); and (5) ‘Riparian-IVB-Big Trees’ (large trees together with ‘IVB-Riparian’). In the non-forested area of the catchment, ‘Riparian-IVB-Big Trees’ (301 t), ‘Big Trees’ (249 t) and ‘Riparian-IVB’ (200 t) had the highest aboveground biomass retained, whereas ‘Broad’ resulted in the most pasture area (~33 ha) followed by ‘Riparian-IVB’ (~26 ha). The ‘Riparian-IVB’ treatment had the highest tree density within the vegetation bands and more than half (53%) of the original woody biomass in regrowth was retained on just under a quarter (23%) of the land area minimising the impact on the area of pasture/grazing land. This subsequently resulted in the ‘Riparian-IVB’ treatment having the highest carbon offset value (A$605 ha–1). The results demonstrate that the retention of native regrowth vegetation in either IVB or as large paddock trees can retain a large amount of aboveground biomass, with IVB having greater returns per hectare.
Keyword Aboveground biomass
Carbon offsets
Grazing land
Large trees
Regrowth of native vegetation.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Official 2016 Collection
 
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