Analysis of long-term light-trap data for Helicoverpa spp. (Lepidoptera : Noctuidae) in Australia: the effect of climate and crop host plants

Maelzer, D. A. and Zalucki, M. P. (1999) Analysis of long-term light-trap data for Helicoverpa spp. (Lepidoptera : Noctuidae) in Australia: the effect of climate and crop host plants. Bulletin of Entomological Research, 89 5: 455-463.

Author Maelzer, D. A.
Zalucki, M. P.
Title Analysis of long-term light-trap data for Helicoverpa spp. (Lepidoptera : Noctuidae) in Australia: the effect of climate and crop host plants
Journal name Bulletin of Entomological Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-4853
1475-2670
Publication date 1999
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 89
Issue 5
Start page 455
End page 463
Total pages 9
Place of publication Wallingford, UK
Publisher CAP International
Collection year 2000
Language eng
Subject C1
300303 Plant Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)
770804 Control of pests and exotic species
Abstract Regression analyses of a long series of light-trap catches at Narrabri, Australia, were used to describe the seasonal dynamics of Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner). The size of the second generation was significantly related to the size of the first generation, to winter rainfall, which had a positive effect, and to spring rainfall which had a negative effect. These variables accounted for up to 96% of the variation in size of the second generation from year to year. Rainfall and crop hosts were also important for the size of the third generation. The area and tonnage of many potential host crops were significantly correlated with winter rain. When winter rain was omitted from the analysis, the sizes of both the second and third generations could be expressed as a function of the size of the previous generation and of the areas planted to lucerne, sorghum and maize. Lucerne and maize always had positive coefficients and sorghum a negative one. We extended our analysis to catches of H. punctigera (Wallengren), which declines in abundance after the second generation. Winter rain had a positive effect on the sizes of the second and third generations, and rain in spring or early summer had a negative effect. Only the area grown to lucerne had a positive effect on abundance. Forecasts of pest levels from a few months to a few weeks in advance are discussed, along with the improved understanding of the seasonal dynamics of both species and the significance of crops in the management of insecticide resistance for H. armigera.
Keyword Entomology
Heliothis-armigera Hubner
Punctigera Wallengren Lepidoptera
New-south-wales
Pest-management
Namoi Valley
Ecology
Cotton
Abundance
Survival
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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