Is there change over time in the season-of-birth effect for schizophrenia? Data from the southern hemisphere

Welham, J.L., Chant, D., Davies, G. and McGrath, J.J. (2000). Is there change over time in the season-of-birth effect for schizophrenia? Data from the southern hemisphere. In: Schizophrenia Research: Abstracts of the Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia. Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia, Davos, Switzerland, (62-63). 5-11 February, 2000. doi:10.1016/S0920-9964(00)90438-9


Author Welham, J.L.
Chant, D.
Davies, G.
McGrath, J.J.
Title of paper Is there change over time in the season-of-birth effect for schizophrenia? Data from the southern hemisphere
Conference name Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia
Conference location Davos, Switzerland
Conference dates 5-11 February, 2000
Proceedings title Schizophrenia Research: Abstracts of the Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Schizophrenia Research   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Amsterdam
Publisher Elsevier
Publication Year 2000
DOI 10.1016/S0920-9964(00)90438-9
ISSN 0920-9964
Volume 41
Issue 1
Start page 62
End page 63
Total pages 2
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The aim of this paper is to examine distributions of schizophrenia and general population births over time in order to determine whether (a) the pattern has changed over time, (b) any pattern was similar for both males and females, and (c) whether there is any indication that there is any relationship between the changes in pattern between schizophrenia and general population births. Birth month and year for 7807 individuals with ICD8/9 schizophrenia were gained from the Queensland Mental Health Statistical System for 1914-1975. Monthly births for the general population in Queensland for the same period were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. For each decade we obtained two comparisons, (1) between two 'seasons' (summer-autumn/winter-spring), and (2) between the third (coldest) quarter and the remaining quarters. Based on expected contrasts from general population proportions, odds ratios and their confidence intervals were used to analyse these comparisons for all subjects, and for males and females separately. The seasonality found in our previous studies was again evident (OR 1.09; 95% CI= 1.01-1.17). However there was no significant change in its pattern over time either for the total group or for males and females separately. When the general population births alone were examined using the same contrasts, seasonality was also observed, but here there were fluctuations over time. These results suggest that exposures linked to changes in general population births over time should be examined in disorders such as schizophrenia which demonstrate seasonality in births. The Stanley Foundation supported this project.
Subjects 110319 Psychiatry (incl. Psychotherapy)
111714 Mental Health
Keyword Psychiatry
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 21:34:43 EST