Congenital cytomegalovirus infection is a significant cause of moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss in Queensland children

Toumpas, Christopher J., Clark, Julia, Harris, Alison, Beswick, Rachael and Nourse, Clare B. (2015) Congenital cytomegalovirus infection is a significant cause of moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss in Queensland children. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 51 5: 541-544. doi:10.1111/jpc.12776


Author Toumpas, Christopher J.
Clark, Julia
Harris, Alison
Beswick, Rachael
Nourse, Clare B.
Title Congenital cytomegalovirus infection is a significant cause of moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss in Queensland children
Journal name Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1034-4810
1440-1754
Publication date 2015-05
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jpc.12776
Open Access Status
Volume 51
Issue 5
Start page 541
End page 544
Total pages 4
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aim

To investigate the proportion of children with moderate to profound hearing loss who have congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection.

Method

Retrospective analysis of CMV dried blood spot (DBS) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in children with moderate to profound hearing impairment referred to tertiary referral centres in Queensland. Participants were under 18 years old with no readily identified cause of hearing impairment, between 2008 and 2011. The primary outcome measure was DBS CMV PCR. Other outcome measures for cases referred to the Childhood Hearing Clinic (CHC) at the Mater Children's Hospital were level of hearing impairment and the neonatal hearing screen result.

Results

Of DBS CMV PCR testing for 106 children at the CHC for 2008 to 2011 inclusive, nine (8.5%) were positive (five with bilateral hearing impairment, four with unilateral hearing impairment). The prevalence of cCMV infection in children with moderate to profound hearing impairment was 8.4%, consistent with the statewide rate of 9.4% for 2008 to mid-2011.

Conclusion

cCMV is a significant cause of hearing impairment in Queensland children. Investigation for cCMV by retrospective DBS CMV PCR should be part of the routine investigation of all babies and young children with hearing impairment. However early diagnosis is preferable and could be achieved by routine early screening of all newborns with hearing impairment for CMV before 3 weeks of age. The healthy hearing screening programme is a routine part of neonatal care. Enhancing the integration of screening for cCMV may reduce the current delays in diagnosis and should be evaluated.
Keyword Time
Diagnosis
Newborns
Etiology
Sequelae
Assays
CMV
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
Child Health Research Centre Publications
 
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