Population statistics as a source of intellectual disability data and possible indicators of co-occurring challenging behaviours in Indigenous adults

Carroll, Michael, Townsend, Clare, Brown, Alinta and Nankervis, Karen (2015) Population statistics as a source of intellectual disability data and possible indicators of co-occurring challenging behaviours in Indigenous adults. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 40 3: 304-308. doi:10.3109/13668250.2015.1041465


Author Carroll, Michael
Townsend, Clare
Brown, Alinta
Nankervis, Karen
Title Population statistics as a source of intellectual disability data and possible indicators of co-occurring challenging behaviours in Indigenous adults
Journal name Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1366-8250
1469-9532
Publication date 2015
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/13668250.2015.1041465
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 40
Issue 3
Start page 304
End page 308
Total pages 5
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background Informed policy and service provision often relies on a sound statistical picture of a population and its geographical dispersion. Such a picture does not presently exist for Indigenous Australians with intellectual disability (ID) and co-occurring challenging behaviour (CB).

Method Population statistics for 18- to 64-year-old Australians were sourced from the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey and 2007–2008 National Health Survey. CB was not directly counted; however, it has been linked to higher severity of intellectual impairment.

Results National prevalence of ID for Indigenous adults was 7.6% and 2.5% for non-Indigenous. ID with profound or severe core activity limitation was 2.1% for Indigenous adults and 0.8% for non-Indigenous.

Conclusion Population statistics afforded a broad picture of ID and severity of intellectual impairment. Policy and service provision for Indigenous peoples will likely benefit from methodologies that supplement population statistics and provide greater understanding of group dispersion.
Keyword Intellectual disability
Indigenous people
Challenging behaviour
Population statistics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Education Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 29 May 2015, 10:56:06 EST by Dr Karen Nankervis on behalf of School of Education