Understanding the Emotional Rollercoaster: The Development and Validation of a New Measure of Adolescent Emotion Regulation

Hodges, Joseph (2014). Understanding the Emotional Rollercoaster: The Development and Validation of a New Measure of Adolescent Emotion Regulation Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
JosephHodges_HonoursThesis.pdf Thesis full text application/pdf 4.11MB 2
Author Hodges, Joseph
Thesis Title Understanding the Emotional Rollercoaster: The Development and Validation of a New Measure of Adolescent Emotion Regulation
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-10-08
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Genevieve Dingle
Total pages 115
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Emotion regulation is widely recognised as a critical component of healthy psychological development. Research in this field has generally focused on the child and adult populations, leaving the adolescent population largely neglected. Despite clear links being established between emotion dysregulation and adolescent psychopathology, there a remains a scarcity of valid age-appropriate measures of emotion regulation for this population. This study examines the psychometric properties of the Emotion Regulation Scenarios for Adolescents (ERSA), a new instrument developed specifically for an adolescent population. To evaluate the validity and reliability of the ERSA, two samples of adolescents (at-risk and control) were recruited (N = 69). Results of the study provide some support for the ERSA’s use in the adolescent population. This research fills a significant gap in emotion regulation research and introduces a measure that may show promise for use in future adolescent research.
Keyword Emotion regulation
Adolescence
Clinical psychology

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 28 May 2015, 11:35:38 EST by Louise Grainger on behalf of School of Psychology