An Investigation into the Effect of Colour Features on Lexical Selection in the Picture- Word Interference Paradigm

Jensen, Kyle (2014). An Investigation into the Effect of Colour Features on Lexical Selection in the Picture- Word Interference Paradigm Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Jensen, Kyle
Thesis Title An Investigation into the Effect of Colour Features on Lexical Selection in the Picture- Word Interference Paradigm
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-10-08
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Greig de Zubicaray
Total pages 61
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Efficient retrieval of object names is fundamental to enabling human linguistic interaction. Theoretical models attempting to explain the mechanisms of name (i.e., lexical) retrieval differ with respect to how object concepts link to lexical representations. Decompositional models assume single conceptual features (e.g., has wings) connect directly to lexical representations (e.g., BIRD), while non-decompositional models assume words and meanings are holistically related. We tested these assumptions using the Picture-Word Interference (PWI) paradigm, in which target pictures (named aloud) are paired with distractor words. Naming latencies in PWI vary according to the semantic relationship between targets and distractors. Categorical relations increase naming latencies, while other types of semantic relation (e.g., associates) typically facilitate them compared to unrelated distractors. In two Experiments, we manipulated target-distractor relations using a single conceptual feature, object colour diagnosticity (e.g., a FROG is typically green) that has been shown to affect latencies in basic naming. High colour diagnostic (HCD) objects (e.g., SPINACH) were paired with distractor words that were either congruent (spinach), unrelated (camera), colour-related (emerald), or colour- and semantically-related via a superordinate category (e.g., crocodile and SPINACH are both living things). Significant effects of shared colour were identified with both chromatic (Experiment 1) and achromatic (Experiment 2) stimuli. Colour-related distractors increased latencies when the target shared a superordinate category (SPINACHcrocodile), and speeded naming when the super-ordinate category was absent (SPINACH-emerald). We interpret these findings as supporting decompositional accounts of conceptual representations.
Keyword Lexical selection
Cognition
Picture-Word Interference

 
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Created: Wed, 27 May 2015, 14:08:40 EST by Louise Grainger on behalf of School of Psychology