Using Eye Tracking to Examine the Effects of Hospital Observation Chart Design on Abnormal Vital Sign Detection

Cornish, Lillian (2014). Using Eye Tracking to Examine the Effects of Hospital Observation Chart Design on Abnormal Vital Sign Detection Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Cornish, Lillian
Thesis Title Using Eye Tracking to Examine the Effects of Hospital Observation Chart Design on Abnormal Vital Sign Detection
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-10-08
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Marcus Watson
Total pages 90
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Hospital observation charts that are designed with stronger conformity to usability principles enhance the accuracy and speed with which abnormal vital signs can be identified. However, the extent to which specific design features advantage performance is largely unknown. The perceptual processes underpinning performance are also undetermined. In this experiment, two major chart design features were studied: the representation of vital sign data (graphical or numerical) and the use of colour-coding to indicate abnormality. Psychology students and community members (N = 43) searched for abnormal vital signs on three versions of the Adult Deterioration Detection System chart: the original colour-coded and graphical chart, a novel version without colour-coding, and a novel version with data recorded numerically rather than graphically. Participants responded by identifying an abnormal vital sign, or indicating that all vital signs were normal. Performance measures included speed and accuracy. In addition, each participant’s gaze was tracked during search. Perceptual processing measures included fixation count and fixation duration. In the context of this task, better performance was indicated by lower fixation counts (indicating high search efficiency and abnormality saliency) and shorter fixation durations (indicating low mental workload). As expected, for all performance and eye tracking measures the colour-coded chart significantly outperformed the graphical chart without colour-coding, which in turn significantly outperformed the numerical chart. This emphasises the importance of graphical representation and colour-coding for enhancing the visual salience of important information and the ease with which it is interpreted. Such evidence provides empirical support for chart design guidelines, and may inform the design of other patient record documents implicated in patient outcomes.
Keyword Eye tracking
Cognitive psychology
Patient care

 
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Created: Wed, 27 May 2015, 12:10:34 EST by Louise Grainger on behalf of School of Psychology