Synergistic mortality caused by Plasmodium falciparum during the 1918 influenza pandemic

Shanks, G. Dennis (2015) Synergistic mortality caused by Plasmodium falciparum during the 1918 influenza pandemic. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 92 5: 941-942. doi:10.4269/ajtmh.14-0792

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ360836_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 40.13KB 0

Author Shanks, G. Dennis
Title Synergistic mortality caused by Plasmodium falciparum during the 1918 influenza pandemic
Formatted title
Synergistic mortality caused by Plasmodium falciparum during the 1918 influenza pandemic
Journal name American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9637
1476-1645
Publication date 2015-05-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.4269/ajtmh.14-0792
Open Access Status
Volume 92
Issue 5
Start page 941
End page 942
Total pages 2
Place of publication Deerfield, IL United States
Publisher American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
At the end of World War I, British medical officers noted that soldiers infected with malaria were more likely to die during the 1918 influenza pandemic than those without malaria. This synergistic mortality appeared to be specific to Plasmodium falciparum and has not been generally noted since 1920. A possible explanation is that a malaria-induced procoagulant state enhanced the activation of influenza virus to increase inflammation and subsequent severe clinical outcomes. Falciparum proteins bind and likely inhibit antithrombin 3 and other factors. Pathogens interact in ways that may inform pathophysiology studies of remote epidemics.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 26 May 2015, 02:06:43 EST by System User on behalf of School of Public Health