Parenting in the Technology Generation: Exploring the Impact of Technology on Adolescents and their Parents

Currie, Melissa (2014). Parenting in the Technology Generation: Exploring the Impact of Technology on Adolescents and their Parents Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Currie, Melissa
Thesis Title Parenting in the Technology Generation: Exploring the Impact of Technology on Adolescents and their Parents
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-10-07
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Kylie Burke
Total pages 114
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Adolescents are among the highest users of technology and are typically early adopters of new technologies, including internet, mobile phones, social media and other devices. However, currently there is little understanding of the impact of technology use on adolescents’ relationships with their parents and family. Such an understanding is critical given that a warm, loving relationship with parents, along with experiencing effective parenting are key factors in both protecting adolescents from developing behavioural difficulties and for promoting their positive development. This study aimed to investigate the influence of technology on the parent-adolescent relationship, parenting practices and behavioural outcomes of adolescents (behavioural difficulties and social competence). One hundred and fourteen parents of adolescents (aged 11 – 18 years) completed an online survey. It was hypothesised that high adolescent and parent technology use and technology dependence would be associated with poor parent-adolescent relationships, ineffective parenting practices and poor adolescent outcomes. Similarly, it was hypothesised that lower levels of technology dependence and use would be associated with the development of adolescent social competence. As expected parenting practices (e.g. involvement, spontaneous disclosure, discipline processes) and aspects of the parent-adolescent relationship (hostility and connectedness) were important for the development of adolescents. Mixed support was found for the influence of technology. Adolescent and parent use of technology and parental dependence did not predict adolescent outcomes or the parent-adolescent relationship. However, adolescent dependence on technology was associated with lower social competence and more adolescent behavioural problems. Further, these effects were mediated by hostility suggesting that technology has the potential to negatively impact parentadolescent relationships and in turn adolescent outcomes.
Keyword Adolescents
Parenting
technology

 
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Created: Thu, 21 May 2015, 14:02:14 EST by Louise Grainger on behalf of School of Psychology