Be Still My Beating Heart; a Psychophysiological Integration of Individual Differences in Personality and Autonomic Nervous System Functioning

DuPlessis, Menante (2014). Be Still My Beating Heart; a Psychophysiological Integration of Individual Differences in Personality and Autonomic Nervous System Functioning Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author DuPlessis, Menante
Thesis Title Be Still My Beating Heart; a Psychophysiological Integration of Individual Differences in Personality and Autonomic Nervous System Functioning
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-10-08
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Paul Harnett
Natalie Loxton
Total pages 107
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary A growing trend in the field of mental disorder aetiology research as well as clinical practise is the use of a transdiagnostic approach. This movement argues a set of common underlying mechanisms, varying combinations of which result in different paths to diagnosis and proposed greater understanding of disorder aetiology as well as more efficient and targeted selection of subsequent treatment. Two key common factors in disorder aetiology remain individual differences in personality and autonomic nervous system functioning. The present study examines two key models in explanation of personality and autonomic nervous system functioning respectively, and from a transdiagnostic perspective argues the importance of their integration. Revised reinforcement sensitivity theory (r-RST), is a biologically based model of personality which details five subsystems of behaviour, the Behavioural Approach System (r-BAS), Behavioural Inhibition System (r-BIS) and the Fight, Flight and Freeze (FFFS). Trait level r-BIS is argued as the basis of anxiety related disorders, resulting from over activation of the sympathetic nervous system. The neurovisceral integration model argues the autonomic nervous system as a structural basis and explains maladaptive behaviours important in psychopathology via an individuals’ level of parasympathetic reactivity. As engagement in maladaptive emotion regulation has been argued as a common underlying factor of mood disorders, the present study investigated the respective roles of r-BIS and parasympathetic reactivity in individuals’ engagement in emotional suppression. Heart rate variability (HRV) of 100 participants, comprised of archival and newly collected data, was tested. A significant moderation model and interaction between r-BIS and parasympathetic reactivity was found. Implications of the results for theory and clinical practise are discussed.
Keyword Mental Disorder
Clinical psychology
Aetiology

 
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Created: Thu, 21 May 2015, 11:17:05 EST by Louise Grainger on behalf of School of Psychology