Depression prevention, labour force participation and income of older working aged Australians: a microsimulation economic analysis

Veerman, J. Lennert, Shrestha, Rupendra N., Mihalopoulos, Cathrine, Passey, Megan E., Kelly, Simon J., Tanton, Robert, Callander, Emily J. and Schofield, Deborah J. (2015) Depression prevention, labour force participation and income of older working aged Australians: a microsimulation economic analysis. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 49 5: 430-436. doi:10.1177/0004867414561528


Author Veerman, J. Lennert
Shrestha, Rupendra N.
Mihalopoulos, Cathrine
Passey, Megan E.
Kelly, Simon J.
Tanton, Robert
Callander, Emily J.
Schofield, Deborah J.
Title Depression prevention, labour force participation and income of older working aged Australians: a microsimulation economic analysis
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-8674
1440-1614
Publication date 2015-05
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0004867414561528
Open Access Status
Volume 49
Issue 5
Start page 430
End page 436
Total pages 7
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher SAGE Publications
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: Depression has economic consequences not only for the health system, but also for individuals and society. This study aims to quantify the potential economic impact of five-yearly screening for sub-syndromal depression in general practice among Australians aged 45-64 years, followed by a group-based psychological intervention to prevent progression to depression.

Method: We used an epidemiological simulation model to estimate reductions in prevalence of depression, and a microsimulation model, Health&WealthMOD2030, to estimate the impact on labour force participation, personal income, savings, taxation revenue and welfare expenditure.

Results: Group therapy is estimated to prevent around 5,200 prevalent cases of depression (2.2%) and add about 520 people to the labour force. Private incomes are projected to increase by $19 million per year, tax revenues by $2.4 million, and transfer payments are reduced by $2.6 million.

Conclusion: Group-based psychological intervention to prevent depression could result in considerable economic benefits in addition to its clinical effects.
Keyword Depressive disorders
Economics
Income
Labour force participation
Welfare
Cost-effectiveness
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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