Influence of playing standard and physical fitness on activity profiles and post-match fatigue during intensified junior rugby league competition

Johnston, Rich D., Gabbett, Tim J. and Jenkins, David G. (2015) Influence of playing standard and physical fitness on activity profiles and post-match fatigue during intensified junior rugby league competition. Sports Medicine - Open, 2 2: . doi:10.1186/s40798-015-0015-y


Author Johnston, Rich D.
Gabbett, Tim J.
Jenkins, David G.
Title Influence of playing standard and physical fitness on activity profiles and post-match fatigue during intensified junior rugby league competition
Journal name Sports Medicine - Open   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2198-9761
Publication date 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/s40798-015-0015-y
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 2
Issue 2
Total pages 10
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher SpringerOpen
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: The aim of this study was to determine whether the fatigue responses to the same intensified rugby league competition differed depending on playing standard and physical fitness.

Methods: Players from a high-standard (n = 15) and a low-standard (n = 16) junior rugby league team had lower body neuromuscular fatigue, perceptual wellbeing, and blood creatine kinase (CK) assessed over an intensified competition. Global positioning system units measured match activity profiles and rating of perceived exertion-assessed internal loads. Players were divided into high- and low-fitness groups across the two standards based on Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test performance.

Results:
Playing intensity increased with playing standard and fitness levels (high-standard = 92 ± 6 m·min−1 vs. 88 ± 6 m·min−1; low-standard = 88 ± 2 m·min−1 vs. 83 ± 6 m·min−1 ). Despite greater internal and external loads, high-fitness players showed smaller reductions in lower body power (high-standard effect size [ES] = −0.74; low-standard ES = −0.41). High-standard players had smaller increases in blood CK (77% ± 94% vs. 113% ± 81%; ES = −0.41), primarily due to very small increases in the high-fitness group (50% ± 45%).  

Conclusions: Increased fitness leads to greater internal and external workloads during intensified competition, smaller increases in blood CK, and less neuromuscular fatigue. Maximising player fitness should be a primary goal of coaches in order to increase match workloads and reduce post-match fatigue during intensified competition.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 15 May 2015, 09:58:07 EST by Dr David Jenkins on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences