Life-history consequences of divergent selection on egg size in Drosophila melanogaster

Schwarzkopf, L., Blows, M. W. and Caley, M. J. (1999) Life-history consequences of divergent selection on egg size in Drosophila melanogaster. American Naturalist, 154 3: 333-340. doi:10.1086/303242

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Author Schwarzkopf, L.
Blows, M. W.
Caley, M. J.
Title Life-history consequences of divergent selection on egg size in Drosophila melanogaster
Journal name American Naturalist   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-0147
Publication date 1999
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/303242
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 154
Issue 3
Start page 333
End page 340
Total pages 8
Place of publication Chicago, IL, United States
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Language eng
Subject 06 Biological Sciences
Abstract Life histories are generally assumed to evolve via antagonistic pleiotropy (negative genetic correlations) among traits, and trade-offs between life-history traits are typically studied using either phenotypic manipulations or selection experiments. We investigated the trade-off between egg size and fecundity in Drosophila melanogaster by examining both the phenotypic and genetic relationships between these traits after artificial selection for large and small eggs, relative to female body size. Egg size responded strongly to selection in both directions, increasing in the large-egg selected lines and decreasing in the small-egg selected lines. Phenotypic correlations between egg size and fecundity in the large-egg selected lines were negative, but no relationship between these traits occurred in either the control or small-egg selected lines. There was no negative genetic correlation between egg size and fecundity. Total reproductive allocation decreased in the small-egg selected lines but did not increase in the large-egg lines. Our results have three implications. First, our selection procedure may have forced females selected for large eggs into a physiological trade-off not reflected in a negative genetic correlation between these traits. Second, the lack of a negative genetic correlation between egg size and number suggests that the phenotypic trade-off frequently observed between egg size and number in other organisms may not evolve over the short term via a direct genetic trade-off whereby increases in egg size are automatically accompanied by decreased fecundity. Finally, total reproductive allocation may not evolve independently of egg size as commonly assumed.
Keyword Biodiversity Conservation
Ecology
Life History
Trade-offs
Egg Size
Fecundity
Drosophila Melanogaster
Quantitative Genetics
Artificial Selection
Marine Benthic Invertebrates
Offspring Size
Reproductive Strategies
Natural-selection
Clutch Size
Trade-offs
Evolution
Number
Costs
Genetics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 49 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 46 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 11:26:38 EST