Interaction of tea polyphenols and food constituents with model gut epithelia: The protective role of the mucus gel layer

D'Agostino, Eleanor M., Rossetti, Damiano, Atkins, Derek, Ferdinando, Dudley and Yakubov, Gleb E. (2012) Interaction of tea polyphenols and food constituents with model gut epithelia: The protective role of the mucus gel layer. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 60 12: 3318-3328. doi:10.1021/jf205111k


Author D'Agostino, Eleanor M.
Rossetti, Damiano
Atkins, Derek
Ferdinando, Dudley
Yakubov, Gleb E.
Title Interaction of tea polyphenols and food constituents with model gut epithelia: The protective role of the mucus gel layer
Journal name Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-8561
1520-5118
Publication date 2012-03-28
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1021/jf205111k
Open Access Status
Volume 60
Issue 12
Start page 3318
End page 3328
Total pages 11
Place of publication Washington, DC United States
Publisher American Chemical Society
Language eng
Abstract The luminal surface of the gastrointestinal tract is covered by a mucus gel layer that acts to protect gut epithelial cells from the harsh luminal environment. This study investigated the use of two human colonic adenocarcinoma cell lines, HT29-MTX-E12 and HT29, as a model to mimic gut epithelium with and without a mucus gel layer. The effect of adding the tea polyphenols epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin (EC) to the cells with subsequent examination of cell morphology and viability was assessed. EGCG, at the concentrations tested, was very toxic to the HT29 cells, but less toxic to the HT29-MTX-E12 cells, suggesting that the mucus gel layer on the HT29-MTX-E12 cells can protect the cells against EGCG toxicity. In contrast, EC had no effect on the viability of either the HT29 or HT29-MTX-E12 cells, suggesting that proteins within the mucus gel layer on the apical surface of gut epithelial cells may bind to the galloyl ring of EGCG. The effect of adding food-related ingredients with the ability to complex with EGCG, β-casein and maltodextrin, on cell viability was also examined. The presence of β-casein was very effective in protecting the cells against the toxicity effect of EGCG, but maltodextrin, at the concentration tested, was less effective in protecting against this toxicity. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that the mucus gel layer on HT29 human colonic adenocarcinoma cells may protect these cells against EGCG toxicity. In addition, the data showing reduced toxicity of EC compared to that of EGCG suggest that the cytotoxic effects of high polyphenol levels may be associated with the ability of polyphenols to interact with cellular proteins and mucins.
Keyword β casein
Gut epithelial cells
Maltodextrin
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Chemical Engineering Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 14 May 2015, 16:27:18 EST by Gleb Yakubov on behalf of School of Chemical Engineering