Psychological distress and quality of life in lung cancer: the role of health-related stigma, illness appraisals and social constraints

Chambers, Suzanne K., Baade, Peter, Youl, Philippa, Aitken, Joanne, Occhipinti, Stefano, Vinod, Shalini, Valery, Patricia C., Garvey, Garvey, Fong, Kwun M., Ball, David, Zorbas, Helen, Dunn, Jeff and O'Connell, Dianne L. (2015) Psychological distress and quality of life in lung cancer: the role of health-related stigma, illness appraisals and social constraints. Psycho-Oncology, 24 11: 1569-1577. doi:10.1002/pon.3829


Author Chambers, Suzanne K.
Baade, Peter
Youl, Philippa
Aitken, Joanne
Occhipinti, Stefano
Vinod, Shalini
Valery, Patricia C.
Garvey, Garvey
Fong, Kwun M.
Ball, David
Zorbas, Helen
Dunn, Jeff
O'Connell, Dianne L.
Title Psychological distress and quality of life in lung cancer: the role of health-related stigma, illness appraisals and social constraints
Journal name Psycho-Oncology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1099-1611
1057-9249
Publication date 2015-11-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/pon.3829
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 24
Issue 11
Start page 1569
End page 1577
Total pages 9
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective
Health-related stigma is associated with negative psychological and quality of life outcomes in lung cancer patients. This study describes the impact of stigma on lung cancer patients' psychological distress and quality of life and explores the role of social constraints and illness appraisal as mediators of effect.

Methods
A self-administered cross-sectional survey examined psychological distress and quality of life in 151 people (59% response rate) diagnosed with lung cancer from Queensland and New South Wales. Health-related stigma, social constraints and illness appraisals were assessed as predictors of adjustment outcomes.

Results
Forty-nine percent of patients reported elevated anxiety; 41% were depressed; and 51% had high global distress. Health-related stigma was significantly related to global psychological distress and quality of life with greater stigma and shame related to poorer outcomes. These effects were mediated by illness appraisals and social constraints.

Conclusions
Health-related stigma appears to contribute to poorer adjustment by constraining interpersonal discussions about cancer and heightening feelings of threat. There is a need for the development and evaluation of interventions to ameliorate the negative effects of health-related stigma among lung cancer patients.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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