The role of roads and urban area in occurrence of an ornamental invasive weed: a case of Rudbeckia laciniata L

Akasaka, Munemitsu, Osawa, Takeshi and Ikegami, Makihiko (2015) The role of roads and urban area in occurrence of an ornamental invasive weed: a case of Rudbeckia laciniata L. Urban Ecosystems, 18 3: 1021-1030. doi:10.1007/s11252-015-0466-4


Author Akasaka, Munemitsu
Osawa, Takeshi
Ikegami, Makihiko
Title The role of roads and urban area in occurrence of an ornamental invasive weed: a case of Rudbeckia laciniata L
Journal name Urban Ecosystems   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1573-1642
1083-8155
Publication date 2015-04-26
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11252-015-0466-4
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 18
Issue 3
Start page 1021
End page 1030
Total pages 10
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer New York
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Road density and proportion of urban area are considered to be useful indicators of invasion risk from non-native plants. However, the mechanisms behind the relationship between these indicators and establishment of non-native species have rarely been addressed explicitly. To identify these mechanisms, we used a species distribution model (MaxEnt) for an invasive ornamental weed Rudbeckia laciniata using road density and proportion of urban area as explanatory variables, along with soil moisture and solar radiation. Overall model performance is relatively high (AUC = 0.91). Road density explained most R. laciniata occurrence, followed by the proportion of urban area. The occurrence probability of R. laciniata increased monotonically with road density, but the rates of increase constantly fell. The occurrence probability also increased with urban area when the proportion of urban area was small, but started to decrease when the proportion of urban area reached 0.2. Our results suggest that both road density and proportion of urban area are important factors in determining R. laciniata establishment but work differently.
Keyword Biological invasion
Distribution
Landscape planning
National park
Risk management
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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