An observational study of sun-protective behaviour at an outdoor spectator sporting event in a region of high sun exposure

Nikles, Jane and Harrison, Simone Lee (2013) An observational study of sun-protective behaviour at an outdoor spectator sporting event in a region of high sun exposure. Journal of Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis, . doi:10.4172/2157-2518.S4-003


Author Nikles, Jane
Harrison, Simone Lee
Title An observational study of sun-protective behaviour at an outdoor spectator sporting event in a region of high sun exposure
Journal name Journal of Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2157-2518
Publication date 2013-04-27
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.4172/2157-2518.S4-003
Open Access Status DOI
Total pages 6
Place of publication Los Angeles, CA, United States
Publisher Omics Publishing Group
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction: Few studies have described observed sun-protection behaviours. We aimed to describe the prevalence of observed sun-protection behaviour of a high-risk population in tropical Queensland engaged in outdoor leisure activity, to act as a baseline for future comparisons and to highlight the need for further work to improve sun-protective behaviours in this high risk population

. Methods: Unobtrusive observations of clothing worn by 457 attendees at the Supercar Championship in Townsville, Queensland, Australia were conducted in an unshaded area around solar noon, in July 2009. A descriptive and chi-square analysis was conducted using SPSS

. Results: Caps were the most popular hat choice. Significantly more children (45.1%) than adults (27.1%) wore wide-brimmed/legionnaires/ bucket hats. Many women (35.3%), girls (26.3%), men (24.5%) and boys (18.8%) wore no hat.
Significantly more females (34.3%) than males (23.9%) wore no hat. Significantly more women (17.4%) than men (6.6%) wore full-length/ ¾-sleeves. Short-sleeve shirts were worn by 90% of men and 55% of women. A further 28% of women wore sleeveless/cap-sleeved shirts. These proportions were significantly different. More girls (27.7%) than boys (3%) wore sleeveless/cap-sleeved shirts.
More boys (87.9%) than girls (61.1%) wore short-sleeves. Both these proportions were significantly different. Full-length/ ¾-sleeves were equally uncommon among boys (9.1%) and girls (11.1%).

Conclusions: Despite a widespread SunSmart campaign in Australia over the past three decades, observed sun protection behaviour at this event were not consistent with Cancer Council Australia recommendations for personal sun protection
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Discipline of General Practice Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 10 May 2015, 08:01:53 EST by Dr Jane Nikles on behalf of Discipline of General Practice