The roles of conceptual feature overlap and distinctiveness during lexical access in spoken word production

Vieth, Harrison (2015). The roles of conceptual feature overlap and distinctiveness during lexical access in spoken word production PhD Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland. doi:10.14264/uql.2015.601

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
s4120108_phd_submission_final.pdf Thesis (open access) application/pdf 1.54MB 60

Author Vieth, Harrison
Thesis Title The roles of conceptual feature overlap and distinctiveness during lexical access in spoken word production
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
DOI 10.14264/uql.2015.601
Publication date 2015-05-08
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Open Access Status Other
Supervisor Greig de Zubicaray
Ross Cunnington
Total pages 110
Language eng
Subjects 1702 Cognitive Sciences
Formatted abstract
To produce a spoken word we must first retrieve it from memory in a process termed lexical selection. Lexical selection by competition theory proposes that retrieval is a process in which multiple word candidates are activated and compete for selection. While this theory has been prominent for several decades, it has been challenged in recent years by empirical demonstrations of semantic context effects in naming paradigms that are difficult to reconcile with a competitive lexical selection mechanism. These findings have led to novel theoretical accounts being formulated. This dissertation investigates how the structural organization of conceptual information influences spoken word production according to the different theoretical accounts. In simple terms, how are object concepts that we express everyday organized with respect to their constituent features, and how do these features determine semantic context effects in naming paradigms? Using picture-word interference and blocked cyclic paradigms in conjunction with functional neuroimaging, I investigated the potentially different roles that conceptual feature overlap and feature distinctiveness have in influencing semantic context effects in naming. Over three chapters comprising nine experiments, I show recent empirical findings used to challenge the competitive lexical selection account are not replicable. Further, I show that increasing conceptual feature overlap is primarily responsible for slowing naming latencies in semantic contexts. I conclude that a competitive account remains the most viable explanation of lexical selection in speech production.
Keyword Lexical access
Semantic interference
Picture naming
Conceptual features
Functional imaging

Document type: Thesis
Collections: UQ Theses (RHD) - Official
UQ Theses (RHD) - Open Access
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 04 May 2015, 10:05:40 EST by Harrison Vieth on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service