Impact of fairness on learning in young children

Anderson, Ellen (2014). Impact of fairness on learning in young children Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Anderson, Ellen
Thesis Title Impact of fairness on learning in young children
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-10-08
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Mark Nielsen
Total pages 62
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Imitation is an especially powerful method of social learning for young children and it can be enhanced or attenuated through a variety of mechanisms. The aim of the current study was to investigate how fair or unfair treatment of children by a potential model influences children’s imitative behaviour. Children (N = 39, 4- to 5.5-year-olds) were presented with a scenario involving puppets, in which an allocating hand puppet divided stickers between the child and a second puppet. The children were advantaged (given more stickers than the second puppet), disadvantaged (given less stickers) or treated fairly (given the same amount) by the allocating puppet. An imitation task was then presented whereby the puppets demonstrated how to retrieve a toy from a puzzle box using distinct methods and the child was subsequently given the opportunity to retrieve the toy. This sequence of distribution, demonstration and opportunity for imitation was repeated in two subsequent trials (each with the same distribution of stickers). Based on previous research regarding influences on imitation, it was hypothesised that children who were disadvantaged would imitate the allocating puppet significantly less than children who were treated fairly or who were advantaged. Contrary to predictions children who were advantaged imitated the allocating puppet significantly less than children who were treated fairly or who were disadvantaged. The possible explanations and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed along with suggestions for future research.
Keyword Impact
Fairness
Learning
Young children

 
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Created: Wed, 29 Apr 2015, 11:22:21 EST by Anita Whybrow on behalf of School of Psychology