Seen it. Pinned it. Done it: The effects of vicarious goal satiation and “pinning” on Pinterest users’ goal motivation

Lindsay, Debra (2014). Seen it. Pinned it. Done it: The effects of vicarious goal satiation and “pinning” on Pinterest users’ goal motivation Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Lindsay, Debra
Thesis Title Seen it. Pinned it. Done it: The effects of vicarious goal satiation and “pinning” on Pinterest users’ goal motivation
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-10-08
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Stephanie Tobin
Total pages 65
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary This study explored mechanisms which may decrease goal motivation in Pinterest users, specifically: vicarious goal satiation and the act of pinning images. Pinterest users may encounter vicarious goal satiation when observing completed goals, which then satiates the drive to achieve the same goal. Further, the act of pinning may reduce motivation through various mechanisms; either perceived goal progress or increased attendance to desired goal outcomes. Participants (N = 163) were randomly assigned to conditions where they saw complete or incomplete creative projects, pinned images they liked or did not pin any images, and were asked to look for a project they would like to try or were provided no additional instructions. Motivation to complete creative goals was measured by performance on a creative word association task. The study predicted that participants who saw complete creative projects would have less motivation for creative goals than those who saw incomplete creative projects (vicarious goal satiation). Secondly, it explored whether having a conscious goal facilitated or protected against vicarious goal satiation. Finally, it was expected participants who pinned images would have less motivation on the creative word association task than those who did not pin images. Results found no significant effects of project completion or pinning. Having a conscious goal did not facilitate or protect against vicarious goal satiation. Post hoc analysis of the second half of the word task was conducted to introduce an artificial delay revealing a marginal pin by seek interaction. Participants who had a conscious goal and did not pin images had greater motivation than those who did pin images. Further research addressing the limitations of this study is needed to explore goal satiation effects on Pinterest users.
Keyword Vicarious goal satiation
Pinterest
goal motivation
pinning

 
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Created: Wed, 29 Apr 2015, 10:51:43 EST by Anita Whybrow on behalf of School of Psychology