Do you hear what I hear? The Effect of Shared Social Identity on Music Liking and Processing

Huynh, Cam (2014). Do you hear what I hear? The Effect of Shared Social Identity on Music Liking and Processing Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Huynh, Cam
Thesis Title Do you hear what I hear? The Effect of Shared Social Identity on Music Liking and Processing
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-10-08
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Katharine Greenaway
Total pages 92
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary What factors influence liking for a piece of music? In answering this question, prior research on musical preferences has focused primarily on intrinsic characteristics of the music such as pitch, tempo and repetition. This thesis took a novel approach and examined how shared social identity influenced individuals’ liking and processing of music. Participants’ (N = 120) social identity as NOVA or Triple J fan was first made salient before watching a 30 second video of a listener enjoying a song on headphones. The listener was identified as either NOVA or Triple J fan. It was hypothesized that when participants and the listener shared the same social identity (e.g. both are NOVA fan), participants would like the song more and process it more deeply. Hypotheses were partially supported. Participants were willing to pay more for the song and process it more deeply when they shared the same social identity with the listener. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.
Keyword shared
Social Identity
music
liking
processing

 
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Created: Mon, 27 Apr 2015, 13:34:18 EST by Anita Whybrow on behalf of School of Psychology