Shared and Unique Risk Correlates of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury, Disordered Eating and Their Co-occurrence

Stewart, Bridie (2014). Shared and Unique Risk Correlates of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury, Disordered Eating and Their Co-occurrence Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Stewart, Bridie
Thesis Title Shared and Unique Risk Correlates of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury, Disordered Eating and Their Co-occurrence
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-10-08
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Graham Martin
Total pages 93
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Research indicates non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and disordered eating (DE) frequently cooccur (NSSI+DE). The present study investigated potential shared and unique risk correlates of NSSI, DE and NSSI+DE, focusing on the cognitive emotion regulation strategies of selfblame, catastrophizing, rumination and positive reappraisal. Previously identified risk correlates were also examined, including depression, body dissatisfaction and appearance investment. The addition of a control group extended previous findings. University undergraduates and community members completed an online questionnaire. A final sample of 230 European females was selected, with participants categorized into one of four groups: NSSI, DE, NSSI+DE or control. Results indicate catastrophizing, rumination, depressive symptoms, body dissatisfaction and self-blame may be shared risk correlates of NSSI, DE and NSSI+DE, with these groups scoring significantly higher (or showing strong upwards trends), compared to the control group. Similarly, less positive reappraisal may be a shared risk correlate. Some differences between the NSSI, DE and NSSI+DE groups emerged. The NSSI+DE group reported less positive reappraisal compared to the DE group. In addition, the NSSI+DE group scored higher for depressive symptoms, body dissatisfaction and selfblame, compared to both the NSSI and DE groups. Notably, elevated depressive symptoms significantly predicted NSSI+DE group membership from NSSI and DE group membership. Elevated investment in appearance may be uniquely associated with DE behaviours, with the NSSI+DE and DE groups scoring higher than the NSSI and control groups. Consistent with this finding, logistic regression analyses revealed higher scores for appearance investment significantly predicted NSSI+DE and DE group membership from NSSI group membership. The theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed, alongside directions for future research.
Keyword Risk
correlates
Nonsuicidal self-injury
Disordered eating
co-occurrence

 
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Created: Mon, 27 Apr 2015, 13:30:54 EST by Anita Whybrow on behalf of School of Psychology