Adult Attachment as a Predictor of Long-term Damage to Couple Relationships in the Context of Hurtful Partner Behaviour

Tse, Brendan (2014). Adult Attachment as a Predictor of Long-term Damage to Couple Relationships in the Context of Hurtful Partner Behaviour Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
BrendanTse_HonoursThesis.pdf Thesis full text application/pdf 1.30MB 16
Author Tse, Brendan
Thesis Title Adult Attachment as a Predictor of Long-term Damage to Couple Relationships in the Context of Hurtful Partner Behaviour
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-10-08
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Judith Feeney
Total pages 89
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hurtful events on couple relationships. Previous research has identified attachment as a key factor in influencing immediate perceptions of hurtful events, which subsequently influence the degree of ongoing damage to the relationship. The primary aim of the study was to investigate whether the associations between attachment dimensions and long-term relational damage are mediated by theoretically relevant variables. The secondary aim was to test for differences in ratings of perceived hurt and relational damage according to attachment style and the type of hurtful event (e.g., criticism vs sexual infidelity). Participants (N = 132) completed a survey which included adult attachment measures, and also required respondents to recall a specific hurtful event and rate their perceptions of intentionality, offender remorse, own behaviour and longterm damage to the relationship. Further, participants were asked to read descriptions of five types of hurtful events, and to rate levels of perceived hurt and relational damage for each one. Contrary to hypotheses, the association between attachment anxiety and long-term relational damage was not mediated by attributions of intentionality or aggressive victim behaviour. However, unexpectedly, avoidant victim behaviour partially mediated the association between attachment anxiety and long-term relational damage. Further, the association between attachment avoidance and ongoing relational damage was not mediated by perceived offender remorse or avoidant victim behaviour. In fact, attachment avoidance was unrelated to perceived offender remorse, avoidant victim behaviour and ongoing effects on the relationship. In terms of the secondary analyses, it was revealed that overall, fearful and dismissing individuals reported the highest levels of perceived hurt and relational damage across the different types of hurtful events. Further, sexual infidelity and active disassociation were perceived as most hurtful and most damaging of the five types of events. Implications and future directions for research are discussed.
Keyword Attachment
Predictor
long-term
damage
couple
Relationships
Hurtful events
partner
Behaviour

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 27 Apr 2015, 13:24:18 EST by Anita Whybrow on behalf of School of Psychology