Relationships of maternal and paternal anthropometry with neonatal body size, proportions and adiposity in an Australian cohort

Pomeroy, Emma, Wells, Jonathan C. K., Cole, Tim J., O'Callaghan, Michael and Stock, Jay T. (2015) Relationships of maternal and paternal anthropometry with neonatal body size, proportions and adiposity in an Australian cohort. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 156 4: 625-636. doi:10.1002/ajpa.22680


Author Pomeroy, Emma
Wells, Jonathan C. K.
Cole, Tim J.
O'Callaghan, Michael
Stock, Jay T.
Title Relationships of maternal and paternal anthropometry with neonatal body size, proportions and adiposity in an Australian cohort
Journal name American Journal of Physical Anthropology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1096-8644
0002-9483
Publication date 2015-04
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/ajpa.22680
Volume 156
Issue 4
Start page 625
End page 636
Total pages 12
Place of publication Hoboken, United States
Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract The patterns of association between maternal or paternal and neonatal phenotype may offer insight into how neonatal characteristics are shaped by evolutionary processes, such as conflicting parental interests in fetal investment and obstetric constraints. Paternal interests are theoretically served by maximizing fetal growth, and maternal interests by managing investment in current and future offspring, but whether paternal and maternal influences act on different components of overall size is unknown. We tested whether parents' prepregnancy height and body mass index (BMI) were related to neonatal anthropometry (birthweight, head circumference, absolute and proportional limb segment and trunk lengths, subcutaneous fat) among 1,041 Australian neonates using stepwise linear regression. Maternal and paternal height and maternal BMI were associated with birthweight. Paternal height related to offspring forearm and lower leg lengths, maternal height and BMI to neonatal head circumference, and maternal BMI to offspring adiposity. Principal components analysis identified three components of variability reflecting neonatal “head and trunk skeletal size,” “adiposity,” and “limb lengths.” Regression analyses of the component scores supported the associations of head and trunk size or adiposity with maternal anthropometry, and limb lengths with paternal anthropometry. Our results suggest that while neonatal fatness reflects environmental conditions (maternal physiology), head circumference and limb and trunk lengths show differing associations with parental anthropometry. These patterns may reflect genetics, parental imprinting and environmental influences in a manner consistent with parental conflicts of interest. Paternal height may relate to neonatal limb length as a means of increasing fetal growth without exacerbating the risk of obstetric complications.
Keyword neonatal anthropometry
birthweight
limb length
parental height
parental BMI
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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