Parenting Experiences of Refugee Parents after Re-settlement in Greater Brisbane and their Perceptions of Current Positive Parenting Program Strategies

Perkins, Alice (2014). Parenting Experiences of Refugee Parents after Re-settlement in Greater Brisbane and their Perceptions of Current Positive Parenting Program Strategies Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
AlicePerkins_HonoursThesis.pdf Thesis full text application/pdf 752.18KB 0
Author Perkins, Alice
Thesis Title Parenting Experiences of Refugee Parents after Re-settlement in Greater Brisbane and their Perceptions of Current Positive Parenting Program Strategies
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-10-08
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Ania Filus
Total pages 78
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Parenting post re-settlement in a new country is challenging for many refugee families (Boehlein, et.al., 1995). They have to cope with a number of potential stressors (NCTSN, 2012) which can potentially impact their ability to parent effectively, increasing the likelihood that their children develop child behavioural and emotional problems (Neiderhiser, Reiss & Hetherington et.al., 1999). Currently Australia provides no parenting assistance or information for refugee parents about how to effectively parent in Australian communities. The Positive Parenting Program (Triple P) is a parenting program that could fill this void to offer strategies to increase parent self-efficacy and target problematic child conduct (Sanders, Kirby & Tellegen, 2013). The aim of the current study is to use a mixed-method design to investigate parenting experiences post resettlement, and whether a sub-set of Triple P strategies is perceived by the parents as acceptable and useful. Overall the sample of nine parents reported the Triple P strategies for promoting competency and development were highly acceptable and useful, they were highly likely to and currently engaged in them. In comparison the Triple P strategies for managing misbehaviour were rated significantly more poorly in acceptability and useability, parents reported they were unlikely to engage in the strategies. These quantitative finding are consistent with the qualitative data, where parents reported physical punishment was previously their main disciplinarian strategy preresettlement, and the only real effective method of discipline. An additional six themes extracted from the data describe a strong patriarchal culture and reliance on physical strength. Child protective policies and Centrelink have a significant impact on the family power hierarchy and ability for parents to discipline their children effectively. These finding have implications for how Triple P is presented and implemented with this group of parents, where additional educational components may be needed to address prevalent inaccurate beliefs that may undermine the acceptance of other, non-violent disciplinary techniques.
Keyword Parenting
Refugee families
Child behavioural

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 24 Apr 2015, 01:44:54 EST by Louise Grainger on behalf of School of Psychology