The effects of Red Bull® energy drink compared with caffeine on cycling time trial performance

Quinlivan, Alannah, Irwin, Christopher, Grant, Gary D., Anoopkumar-Dukie, Sheilandra, Skinner, Tina, Leveritt, Michael and Desbrow, Ben (2015) The effects of Red Bull® energy drink compared with caffeine on cycling time trial performance. International Journal of Sport Physiology and Performance, 10 7: 897-901. doi:10.1123/ijspp.2014-0481


Author Quinlivan, Alannah
Irwin, Christopher
Grant, Gary D.
Anoopkumar-Dukie, Sheilandra
Skinner, Tina
Leveritt, Michael
Desbrow, Ben
Title The effects of Red Bull® energy drink compared with caffeine on cycling time trial performance
Journal name International Journal of Sport Physiology and Performance   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1555-0273
1555-0265
Publication date 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1123/ijspp.2014-0481
Volume 10
Issue 7
Start page 897
End page 901
Total pages 19
Place of publication Champaign, IL United States
Publisher Human Kinetics
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study investigated the ergogenic effects of a commercial energy drink (Red Bull®) or an equivalent dose of anhydrous caffeine in comparison to a non-caffeinated control beverage on cycling performance. Eleven trained male cyclists (31.7±5.9yrs, 82.3±6.1kg, VO2 max=60.3±7.8mL·kg-1·min-1) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled and cross-over designed study involving three experimental conditions. Participants were randomly administered Red Bull® (9.4mL·kg-1 BM, containing 3mg·kg-1BM caffeine), anhydrous caffeine (3mg·kg-1 BM given in capsule form) or a placebo 90mins before commencing a time trial equivalent to 1hr cycling at 75% peak power output. Carbohydrate and fluid volumes were matched across all trials. Performance improved by 109±153s (2.8%, p=0.039) after Red Bull® compared with placebo and by 120±172s (3.1%, p=0.043) after caffeine compared with placebo. No significant difference (p>0.05) in performance time was detected between Red Bull® and caffeine treatments. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in mean heart rate or rating of perceived exertion among the three treatments. This study demonstrated that a moderate dose of caffeine consumed as either Red Bull® or in anhydrous form enhanced cycling time trial performance. The ergogenic benefits of Red Bull® energy drink are therefore most likely due to the effects of caffeine, with the other ingredients not likely to offer additional benefit.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 23 Apr 2015, 13:47:27 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences