Generation, selection and sequencing in a case of Parkinson's disease and primary progressive dynamic aphasia

Robinson, Gail (2013). Generation, selection and sequencing in a case of Parkinson's disease and primary progressive dynamic aphasia. In: Conference Abstracts: ACNS-2013 Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Society Conference. ACNS-2013: The 4th Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Society Conference, Melbourne, VIC, Australia, (). 28 November-1 December, 2013. doi:10.3389/conf.fnhum.2013.212.00109


Author Robinson, Gail
Title of paper Generation, selection and sequencing in a case of Parkinson's disease and primary progressive dynamic aphasia
Conference name ACNS-2013: The 4th Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Society Conference
Conference location Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Conference dates 28 November-1 December, 2013
Proceedings title Conference Abstracts: ACNS-2013 Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Society Conference   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Frontiers in Human Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.3389/conf.fnhum.2013.212.00109
Open Access Status DOI
ISSN 1662-5161
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The rare language disorder of dynamic aphasia is reported in a case (MC) with the dual pathologies of non-fluent progressive aphasia and Parkinson’s disease. MC’s language profile was characterised by the hallmark propositional language impairment, as severe as other cases with dynamic aphasia, despite well-preserved core language skills (e.g., naming, reading, repetition, comprehension). Word and sentence generation performance was impaired only when many competing propositions were activated by a stimulus and not when a dominant proposition was available. Discourse generation was extremely reduced and perseverative, consistent with impaired generation and fluent sequencing of novel thoughts. In addition, non-verbal generation was impaired although dissociations emerged. MC was able to generate novel designs and gestures but his performance was highly perseverative. Motor movement selection was also abnormal, resembling a non-random pattern. MC is the first case of dynamic aphasia with concurrent deficits in three mechanisms thought crucial for conceptual preparation processes; namely impaired selection, impaired generation of novel thoughts and impaired fluent sequencing of novel thoughts. The implications are discussed in relation to conceptual preparation processes, accounts of dynamic aphasia and the supporting neural substrates for verbal and non-verbal generation.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 17 Apr 2015, 15:45:55 EST by Gail Robinson on behalf of School of Psychology