Where's your evidence? Challenging young students' equiprobability bias through argumentation

Fielding-Wells, Jill (2014). Where's your evidence? Challenging young students' equiprobability bias through argumentation. In: Katie Makar, Bruno de Sousa and Robert Gould, ICOTS-9 Conference Proceedings: Sustainability in statistics education. Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Teaching Statistics. ICOTS9: 9th International Conference on Teaching Statistics 2014, Flagstaff, AZ, USA, (1-6). 13-18 July, 2014.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Fielding-Wells, Jill
Title of paper Where's your evidence? Challenging young students' equiprobability bias through argumentation
Conference name ICOTS9: 9th International Conference on Teaching Statistics 2014
Conference location Flagstaff, AZ, USA
Conference dates 13-18 July, 2014
Convener International Statistical Institute
Proceedings title ICOTS-9 Conference Proceedings: Sustainability in statistics education. Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Teaching Statistics
Place of Publication Voorburg, Netherlands
Publisher International Association for Statistical Education
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
Editor Katie Makar
Bruno de Sousa
Robert Gould
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Students come to formal schooling with prior probabilistic conceptions developed through informal experiential events. One such concept is that of chance outcomes being inherently equiprobable, even when not the case. In the design-based research described here, a class of 3rd Grade students was posed an inquiry problem embedded with non-equiprobable outcomes: What is the best addition bingo card? Argumentation was employed as a pedagogic approach to challenging students’ equiprobable beliefs, with students supported to develop an evidence-based argument in response. Students initially experienced conflict with the realisation of unequal frequencies, then developed representations to act as theoretical evidence. A shift from conceptualizing equiprobable outcomes towards responses reflecting theoretical distribution was observed. This exploratory research suggests potential for an evidentiary focus to challenge probabilistic conceptions.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

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Created: Wed, 15 Apr 2015, 15:13:28 EST by Jon Swabey on behalf of School of Education