Improving the management and outcome in haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn

Lopriore, Enrico, Rath, Mirjam E. A., Liley, Helen and Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E. H. J. (2013) Improving the management and outcome in haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn. Blood Transfusion, 11 4: 484-486. doi:10.2450/2013.0147-13


Author Lopriore, Enrico
Rath, Mirjam E. A.
Liley, Helen
Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E. H. J.
Title Improving the management and outcome in haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn
Journal name Blood Transfusion   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1723-2007
Publication date 2013
Sub-type Editorial
DOI 10.2450/2013.0147-13
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 11
Issue 4
Start page 484
End page 486
Total pages 3
Place of publication Milan, Italy
Publisher S I M T I Servizi
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn (HDFN) is most commonly due to red cell alloimmunisation. In HDFN, maternal immunoglobulin antibodies directed against foetal red blood cells pass through the placenta into the foetal circulation and cause the destruction of foetal red blood cells. Untreated, HDFN may lead to severe foetal anaemia, foetal hydrops and perinatal death. The prevalence of HDFN has dropped dramatically since the introduction of Rh D prophylaxis in the late 1960s. In addition, the use of advanced Doppler ultrasound techniques to detect foetal anaemia since the early 1970s and treatment with intrauterine intravascular red cell transfusions (IUT) since the 1980s have led to a remarkable reduction in perinatal mortality. Before the introduction of Rh D prophylaxis and IUT, perinatal mortality was approximately 50% and the rate of perinatal morbidity was extremely high1,2. The current most successful treatment, the use of IUT, contributed largely to perinatal survival rates exceeding 95% in experienced centres3,4. Nevertheless, the management and outcome in severe cases of HDFN are still far from optimal and may present great challenges for perinatologists...
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Editorial
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 10 Apr 2015, 18:15:28 EST by Helen Liley on behalf of Paediatrics & Child Health - Mater Hospital