Long term survival outcomes for men who provided ejaculate specimens for prostate cancer research: implications for patient management

Ashrafi, D., Baade, P., Yaxley, J., Roberts, M., Williams, S. and Gardiner, R. A. (Frank) (2015). Long term survival outcomes for men who provided ejaculate specimens for prostate cancer research: implications for patient management. In: Special Issue: Abstracts of the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand 68th Annual Scientific Meeting. USANZ 2015: 68th Annual Scientific Meeting including 20th Annual Meeting of the Australia and New Zealand Urological Nurses Society, Adelaide, SA, Australia, (22-22). 11-14 April, 2015.

Author Ashrafi, D.
Baade, P.
Yaxley, J.
Roberts, M.
Williams, S.
Gardiner, R. A. (Frank)
Title of paper Long term survival outcomes for men who provided ejaculate specimens for prostate cancer research: implications for patient management
Conference name USANZ 2015: 68th Annual Scientific Meeting including 20th Annual Meeting of the Australia and New Zealand Urological Nurses Society
Conference location Adelaide, SA, Australia
Conference dates 11-14 April, 2015
Convener Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand
Proceedings title Special Issue: Abstracts of the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand 68th Annual Scientific Meeting   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name BJU International   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Published abstract
Open Access Status
ISSN 1464-4096
1464-410X
Volume 115
Issue Supp. S4
Start page 22
End page 22
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Introduction & Objectives: Determining whether detection and treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) will benefit patients is problematic. Of prime importance in making this determination is an accurate estimation of the life expectancy of each patient. However, doctors are notoriously inaccurate in predicting patient survival, tending to give patients ‘the benefit of the doubt’ and erring on the side of intervention. Although validated instruments are available for predicting life expectancy, these do not have clinical utility and therefore are not used routinely in clinical practice. Recent evidence indicates that the likelihood of dying from cardiovascular disease is inextricably related to erectile dysfunction (ED). We hypothesised that volunteers who provided ejaculate specimens would have a high survival rate at 10 and 15 years and beyond...
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 08 Apr 2015, 09:47:44 EST by Jessica Eldridge on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research