Sequence type 131 fimH30 and fimH41 subclones amongst Escherichia coli isolates in Australia and New Zealand

Rogers, Benjamin A., Ingram, Paul R., Runnegar, Naomi, Pitman, M.C., Freeman, Joshua T., Athan, Eugene, Havers, Sally, Sidjabat, Hanna E., Gunning, Earlleen, De Almeida, Mary, Styles, Kaylene and Paterson, David L. (2015) Sequence type 131 fimH30 and fimH41 subclones amongst Escherichia coli isolates in Australia and New Zealand. International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, 45 4: 351-358. doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2014.11.015


Author Rogers, Benjamin A.
Ingram, Paul R.
Runnegar, Naomi
Pitman, M.C.
Freeman, Joshua T.
Athan, Eugene
Havers, Sally
Sidjabat, Hanna E.
Gunning, Earlleen
De Almeida, Mary
Styles, Kaylene
Paterson, David L.
Title Sequence type 131 fimH30 and fimH41 subclones amongst Escherichia coli isolates in Australia and New Zealand
Journal name International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0924-8579
1872-7913
Publication date 2015
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2014.11.015
Open Access Status
Volume 45
Issue 4
Start page 351
End page 358
Total pages 8
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The clonal composition of Escherichia coli causing extra-intestinal infections includes ST131 and other common uropathogenic clones. Drivers for the spread of these clones and risks for their acquisition have been difficult to define. In this study, molecular epidemiology was combined with clinical data from 182 patients enrolled in a case–control study of community-onset expanded-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant E. coli (ESC-R-EC) in Australia and New Zealand. Genetic analysis included antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, clonality by DiversiLab (rep-PCR) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and subtyping of ST131 by identification of polymorphisms in the fimH gene. The clonal composition of expanded-spectrum cephalosporin-susceptible E. coli and ESC-R-EC isolates differed, with six MLST clusters amongst susceptible isolates (median 7 isolates/cluster) and three clusters amongst resistant isolates, including 40 (45%) ST131 isolates. Population estimates indicate that ST131 comprises 8% of all E. coli within our population; the fluoroquinolone-susceptible H41 subclone comprised 4.5% and the H30 subclone comprised 3.5%. The H30 subclone comprised 39% of all ESC-R-EC and 41% of all fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli within our population. Patients with ST131 were also more likely than those with non-ST131 isolates to present with an upper than lower urinary tract infection (RR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.01–3.1). ST131 and the H30 subclone were predominant amongst ESC-R-EC but were infrequent amongst susceptible isolates where the H41 subclone was more prevalent. Within our population, the proportional contribution of ST131 to fluoroquinolone resistance is comparable with that of other regions. In contrast, the overall burden of ST131 is low by global standards.
Keyword Cephalosporin resistance
Escherichia coli
ST131
Urinary tract infection
β lactamase
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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