Drinking not thinking: A prospective study of personality traits and drinking motives on alcohol consumption across the first year of university

Loxton, Natalie J, Bunker, Richard J, Dingle, Genevieve A and Wong, Valerie (2015) Drinking not thinking: A prospective study of personality traits and drinking motives on alcohol consumption across the first year of university. Personality and Individual Differences, 79 134-139. doi:10.1016/j.paid.2015.02.010


Author Loxton, Natalie J
Bunker, Richard J
Dingle, Genevieve A
Wong, Valerie
Title Drinking not thinking: A prospective study of personality traits and drinking motives on alcohol consumption across the first year of university
Journal name Personality and Individual Differences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0191-8869
1873-3549
Publication date 2015-06
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.paid.2015.02.010
Open Access Status
Volume 79
Start page 134
End page 139
Total pages 6
Place of publication Kidlington, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press (Elsevier Science)
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The aim of this 3-wave prospective study was to test impulsivity-related and anxiety-related traits and drinking motives as predictors of alcohol consumption during Orientation Week (O-Week), and the first six months of university life in on-campus college residents. Students from two residential colleges (N = 255, 34.5% female) completed surveys of drinking frequency and quantity for the week prior to university entry, during O-Week, 3 and 6 months later. A brief personality screen for impulsivity, sensation-seeking, anxiety sensitivity and hopelessness was administered along with measures of drinking motives and alcohol consumption. Using moderated mediation analyses and multilevel modeling, impulsivity was found to be the best predictor of drinking variability at O-Week with enhancement motives mediating the effect. This mediated effect was moderated by gender with the indirect effect only occurring for women. Impulsivity was also predictive of drinking change over 6 months, with high impulsive students maintaining heavier levels of drinking (even when controlling for gender). The findings of this study further supports impulsivity as a consistent predictor of student alcohol misuse, even in environments with strong pro-drinking cultures.
Keyword Alcohol
Motives
Gender
Impulsivity
Personality
Longitudinal
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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