A field evaluation of a new molecular-based point-of-care test for chlamydia and gonorrhoea in remote Aboriginal health services in Australia

Causer, Louise M, Hengel, Belinda, Natoli, Lisa, Tangey, Annie, Badman, Steven G, Tabrizi, Sepehr N, Whiley, David, Ward, James, Kaldor, John M and Guy, Rebecca J (2014) A field evaluation of a new molecular-based point-of-care test for chlamydia and gonorrhoea in remote Aboriginal health services in Australia. Sexual Health, 12 1: 27-33. doi:10.1071/SH14158


Author Causer, Louise M
Hengel, Belinda
Natoli, Lisa
Tangey, Annie
Badman, Steven G
Tabrizi, Sepehr N
Whiley, David
Ward, James
Kaldor, John M
Guy, Rebecca J
Title A field evaluation of a new molecular-based point-of-care test for chlamydia and gonorrhoea in remote Aboriginal health services in Australia
Journal name Sexual Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1449-8987
Publication date 2014-11-27
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/SH14158
Volume 12
Issue 1
Start page 27
End page 33
Total pages 7
Place of publication Collingwood, Australia
Publisher CSIRO Pubishing
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Point-of-care (POC) tests could be important public health tools in settings with treatment delays and high rates of sexually transmissible infections (STIs). Use is limited due to suboptimal performance. The performance and ease-of-use of a new molecular-based POC test for simultaneous detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) was assessed, alongside two single-organism immunochromatographic tests (ICT).

Methods: The evaluation occurred between May 2012 and March 2013 during community STI screens in two remote Aboriginal health services. Urine was tested with the GeneXpert®CT/NG and if sufficient volume, also with Diaquick CT and Gonorrhoea Card. The gold standard comparison was laboratory nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT). Operational characteristics were also assessed.

Results: Among 198 samples, GeneXpert CT sensitivity and specificity was 100% [95% confidence intervals (CI): 75.9–100] and 99.5% (95% CI: 96.5–100), and NG was 100% (95% CI: 96.5–100) and 100% (95% CI: 97.5–100), respectively. Among a sample subset, Diaquick CT (n = 104) sensitivity and specificity was 27.3% (95% CI: 7.3–60.7) and 66.7% (95% CI: 12.5–98.2), and Gonorrhoea Card (n = 29), was 66.7% (95% CI: 12.5–98.2) and 76.9% (95% CI: 56.0–90.2), respectively. GeneXpert required 1 mL of urine, four steps, 1 min specimen preparation and 90 min to result. ICTs required 15 mL of urine, eight steps, 18 min preparation and 10–15 min to result.

Conclusion: The accuracy and operational benefits of GeneXpert CT/NG make it very suitable in these settings where delays to treatment are encountered.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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