An Investigation of Positive and Negative Contact As Predictors of Intergroup Attitudes in the United States, Hong Kong, and Thailand

Techakesari, Pirathat, Barlow, Fiona Kate, Hornsey, Matthew J, Sung, Billy, Thai, Michael and Chak, Jocelyn L. Y (2015) An Investigation of Positive and Negative Contact As Predictors of Intergroup Attitudes in the United States, Hong Kong, and Thailand. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 46 3: 454-468. doi:10.1177/0022022115570313


Author Techakesari, Pirathat
Barlow, Fiona Kate
Hornsey, Matthew J
Sung, Billy
Thai, Michael
Chak, Jocelyn L. Y
Title An Investigation of Positive and Negative Contact As Predictors of Intergroup Attitudes in the United States, Hong Kong, and Thailand
Journal name Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1552-5422
0022-0221
Publication date 2015-04
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0022022115570313
Volume 46
Issue 3
Start page 454
End page 468
Total pages 15
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, United States
Publisher Sage Publications, Inc
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Contact researchers have overlooked (a) the mechanisms that explain the association between negative contact and prejudice, (b) the effects of positive and negative contact on outcomes beyond prejudice, and (c) the importance of testing contact effects cross-culturally. In the present article, we addressed these gaps in the literature by drawing on data from White Americans (N = 207; Study 1), Hong Kong Chinese (N = 145; Study 2), and Buddhist Thais (N = 161; Study 3). Specifically, we examined positive and negative contact as predictors of old-fashioned and modern prejudice toward, and negative metaperceptions about, Black Americans, Mainland Chinese, and Muslim Thais, respectively. We also tested intergroup anxiety as a mediator of the associations between positive and negative contact, and all intergroup outcomes. Across three studies, positive contact predicted reduced intergroup anxiety, prejudice, and negative metaperceptions, while negative contact predicted increased intergroup anxiety, prejudice, and negative metaperceptions. Negative contact, however, was the more consistent predictor of intergroup attitudes. Intergroup anxiety emerged as a robust mediator of the relationships between both types of contact and all intergroup outcomes. We thus present the first test of a model of positive and negative contact that holds across both Western and non-Western contexts.
Keyword contact hypothesis
positive contact
negative contact
prejudice
metaperception
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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