Environmental context for late Holocene human occupation of the South Wellesley Archipelago, Gulf of Carpentaria, northern Australia

Moss, Patrick, Mackenzie, Lydia, Ulm, Sean, Sloss, Craig, Rosendahl, Daniel, Petherick, Lynda, Steinberger, Lincoln, Wallis, Lynley, Heijnis, Heijnis, Petchey, Fiona and Jacobsen, Geraldine (2015) Environmental context for late Holocene human occupation of the South Wellesley Archipelago, Gulf of Carpentaria, northern Australia. Quaternary International, 385 136-144. doi:10.1016/j.quaint.2015.02.051


Author Moss, Patrick
Mackenzie, Lydia
Ulm, Sean
Sloss, Craig
Rosendahl, Daniel
Petherick, Lynda
Steinberger, Lincoln
Wallis, Lynley
Heijnis, Heijnis
Petchey, Fiona
Jacobsen, Geraldine
Title Environmental context for late Holocene human occupation of the South Wellesley Archipelago, Gulf of Carpentaria, northern Australia
Journal name Quaternary International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1040-6182
1873-4553
Publication date 2015-03-20
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.quaint.2015.02.051
Volume 385
Start page 136
End page 144
Total pages 9
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract A 2400 year record of environmental change is reported from a wetland on Bentinck Island in the southern Gulf of Carpentaria, northern Australia. Three phases of wetland development are identified, with a protected coastal setting from ca. 2400 to 500 years ago, transitioning into an estuarine mangrove forest from ca. 500 years ago to the 1940s, and finally to a freshwater swamp over the past +60 years. This sequence reflects the influence of falling sea-levels, development of a coastal dune barrier system, prograding shorelines, and an extreme storm (cyclone) event. In addition, there is clear evidence of the impacts that human abandonment and resettlement have on the island's fire regimes and vegetation. A dramatic increase in burning and vegetation thickening was observed after the cessation of traditional Indigenous Kaiadilt fire management practices in the 1940s, and was then reversed when people returned to the island in the 1980s. In terms of the longer context for human occupation of the South Wellesley Archipelago, it is apparent that the mangrove phase provided a stable and productive environment that was conducive for human settlement of this region over the past 1000 years.
Keyword Palynology
Fire regimes
Abandonment
Cyclone
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article in press corrected-proof.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Official 2016 Collection
 
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