Novel features of early burst suppression predict outcome after birth asphyxia

Iyer, Kartik K., Roberts, James A., Metsaranta, Marjo, Finnigan, Simon, Breakspear, Michael and Vanhatalo, Sampsa (2014) Novel features of early burst suppression predict outcome after birth asphyxia. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, 1 3: 209-214. doi:10.1002/acn3.32


Author Iyer, Kartik K.
Roberts, James A.
Metsaranta, Marjo
Finnigan, Simon
Breakspear, Michael
Vanhatalo, Sampsa
Title Novel features of early burst suppression predict outcome after birth asphyxia
Journal name Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2328-9503
Publication date 2014-03
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/acn3.32
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 1
Issue 3
Start page 209
End page 214
Total pages 6
Place of publication Bognor Regis, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Burst suppression patterns in the electroencephalogram are a reliable marker of recent severe brain insult. Here we analyze statistical properties of bursts occurring in 20 electroencephalographic recordings acquired from hypothermic asphyxic newborns in the hours immediately following birth. We show that the distributions of burst area and duration in these acute data predict later clinical outcome in both structural neuroimaging and neurodevelopment. Our findings indicate the first early electroencephalographic metrics that offer outcome prediction in asphyxic neonates undergoing hypothermia treatment.
Keyword EEG
Burst suppression
Brain insult
Birth asphyxia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 30 Mar 2015, 13:20:52 EST by Dr Simon Finnigan on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research