The effect of visual cues on how people handle interruptions

Huber, Stephan, Weng, Michael, Grundgeiger, Tobias and Sanderson, Penelope (2014). The effect of visual cues on how people handle interruptions. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 58th Annual Meeting, Chicago, Illinois, (250-254). 27-31 October 2014. doi:10.1177/1541931214581052

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Author Huber, Stephan
Weng, Michael
Grundgeiger, Tobias
Sanderson, Penelope
Title of paper The effect of visual cues on how people handle interruptions
Conference name Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 58th Annual Meeting
Conference location Chicago, Illinois
Conference dates 27-31 October 2014
Convener Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher SAGE
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1177/1541931214581052
ISSN 1541-9312
Volume 58
Issue 1
Start page 250
End page 254
Total pages 5
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract/Summary People in work domains such as healthcare are often interrupted. As a result, they sometimes forget to resume their prior task, which may lead to undesirable consequences. In many cases, strategies such as deferring an interruption for a while can help people lower the risks imposed by interruptions. Using two computer based tasks, we investigated whether visual cues make people more likely to defer an interruption until their current task is finished. Our study participants worked on an arithmetic task and were interrupted from time to time by an animated character inviting them to play Tic-Tac-Toe. Results showed that participants were more likely to defer accepting the interruption and to complete the arithmetic task if the arithmetic task contained visual cues that indicated the location of the next steps, than if it did not. The findings suggest that equipment with appropriately designed visual cues might encourage people to defer interruptions and finish their current tasks. Further research is needed to understand exactly how visual cues promote deferral strategies.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 27 Mar 2015, 21:35:31 EST by Anthony Yeates on behalf of School of Psychology