Investigation of the utility of the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) framework for fostering self-care in clinical psychology trainees

Pakenham, Kenneth Ian (2014) Investigation of the utility of the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) framework for fostering self-care in clinical psychology trainees. Training and Education in Professional Psychology, 9 2: 1-9. doi:10.1037/tep0000074


Author Pakenham, Kenneth Ian
Title Investigation of the utility of the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) framework for fostering self-care in clinical psychology trainees
Journal name Training and Education in Professional Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1931-3918
1931-3926
Publication date 2014-11-03
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/tep0000074
Open Access Status
Volume 9
Issue 2
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher R S C Publications
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Clinical psychology trainees (CPTs) are susceptible to elevated stress. Despite recognition of the need for training in self-care strategies for CPTs, research in this area is limited, with little progress in the evaluation of effective models for guiding self-care training. This study explored the utility of the acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) framework for identifying processes and strategies to enhance self-care in CPTs. A total of 116 CPTs completed questionnaires in the first year of clinical training. The ACT processes constituted the predictors: values, defusion (measured as thought suppression), mindfulness, and acceptance. The adjustment criterion variables included: stress, distress, life satisfaction, and clinical training satisfaction. The ACT processes explained significant amounts of variance in all of the adjustment outcomes, and thought suppression, values, and acceptance each emerged as significant predictors of 1 or more of the outcomes. With the exception of mindfulness, the ACT processes were related to better adjustment as predicted. The adverse effects of thought suppression were pervasive, whereas the beneficial effects of acceptance and values varied across adjustment outcomes. Acceptance had unexpected suppressor effects on mindfulness in regression analyses on distress and stress. Findings support the utility of the ACT framework for explaining and enhancing adjustment and self-care in CPTs.
Keyword Stress
Self-care
Mindfulness
Clinical psychology training
Acceptance and commitment therapy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 3 Nov 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 26 Mar 2015, 18:55:58 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology