Guidance of attention by feature relationships: the end of the road for feature map theories?

Becker, Stefanie I. (2014). Guidance of attention by feature relationships: the end of the road for feature map theories?. In Mike Horsley, Matt Eliot, Bruce Allen Knight and Ronan Reilly (Ed.), Current trends in eye tracking research (pp. 37-49) Heidelberg, Germany: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-02868-2_3


Author Becker, Stefanie I.
Title of chapter Guidance of attention by feature relationships: the end of the road for feature map theories?
Title of book Current trends in eye tracking research
Place of Publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-02868-2_3
Open Access Status
ISBN 9783319028675
9783319028682
Editor Mike Horsley
Matt Eliot
Bruce Allen Knight
Ronan Reilly
Chapter number 3
Start page 37
End page 49
Total pages 13
Total chapters 25
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract/Summary What factors determine which stimuli of a scene will be visually selected and become available for conscious perception? Current models of attention assume that top-down control over visual selection is achieved by tuning attention to specific feature values (e.g. red, green, blue). This modulates the output of feature-specific sensory neurons (‘feature maps’) that guide attention to locations that contain the sought-after feature. Contrary to this prevalent view, it has been proposed that visual selection depends on the context. According to a new relational account, features are appraised in a context-dependent manner, so that items are selected in virtue of their relationship to the context (e.g. redder, larger, darker) rather than their absolute feature values (e.g. red vs. green). The present chapter argues that the feature map concept is untenable in view of recent evidence for the relational account, as feature map theories would have to propose an unrealistically large number of additional feature maps to account for guidance by feature relationships. Moreover, it is argued that top-down tuning to feature relationships is neurologically plausible and that the relational theory can potentially replace current feature-based theories of attention.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 26 Mar 2015, 13:34:10 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology