Musical entanglements at the contact zone: exploring Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian collaborations through contemporary music

Barney, Katelyn (2014). Musical entanglements at the contact zone: exploring Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian collaborations through contemporary music. In: Jadey O'Regan and Toby Wren, Communities, Places, Ecologies: Proceedings of the 2013 IASPM-ANZ Conference. IASPM-ANZ 2013 Conference, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, (1-12). 24-26 November 2013.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Barney, Katelyn
Title of paper Musical entanglements at the contact zone: exploring Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian collaborations through contemporary music
Conference name IASPM-ANZ 2013 Conference
Conference location Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 24-26 November 2013
Proceedings title Communities, Places, Ecologies: Proceedings of the 2013 IASPM-ANZ Conference
Place of Publication Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Publisher The International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM)
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9780975774779
Editor Jadey O'Regan
Toby Wren
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Maddison argues that "the relationship between non-Indigenous and Indigenous Australia [is] profoundly stuck" because of the "repeated failure of policy and of efforts towards reconciliation, accompanied by a pattern of heavy-handed interventions in Indigenous lives, demonstrate our fundamental failure...resolving this tension remains a matter of pressing national significance". Does music have a role in 'unsticking' this relationship? There are many examples of collaborative music making between Indigenous and non-Indigenous contemporary performers. Yet how these collaborations work in practice and whether they contribute to processes of reconciliation is often unknown. Drawing on examples and interviews with a number of Indigenous and non-Indigenous musicians who collaborate, this paper provides a preliminary exploration of how musical collaborations occur and the mutual benefits and difficulties of intercultural collaborative contemporary music making between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. It is part of a larger research project examining how collaboration is played out in specific instances of intercultural musical collaboration between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 25 Mar 2015, 03:56:33 EST by Helena Kajlich on behalf of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit