Parents’ self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and self-reported task performance when managing atopic dermatitis in children: Instrument reliability and validity

Mitchell, Amy E. and Fraser, Jennifer A. (2010) Parents’ self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and self-reported task performance when managing atopic dermatitis in children: Instrument reliability and validity. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 48 2: 215-226. doi:10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2010.06.008


Author Mitchell, Amy E.
Fraser, Jennifer A.
Title Parents’ self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and self-reported task performance when managing atopic dermatitis in children: Instrument reliability and validity
Journal name International Journal of Nursing Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0020-7489
1873-491X
Publication date 2010-07-15
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2010.06.008
Open Access Status
Volume 48
Issue 2
Start page 215
End page 226
Total pages 12
Place of publication Bromley, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background
Support and education for parents faced with managing a child with atopic dermatitis is crucial to the success of current treatments. Interventions aiming to improve parent management of this condition are promising. Unfortunately, evaluation is hampered by lack of precise research tools to measure change.

Objectives
To develop a suite of valid and reliable research instruments to appraise parents’ self-efficacy for performing atopic dermatitis management tasks; outcome expectations of performing management tasks; and self-reported task performance in a community sample of parents of children with atopic dermatitis.

Methods
The Parents’ Eczema Management Scale (PEMS) and the Parents’ Outcome Expectations of Eczema Management Scale (POEEMS) were developed from an existing self-efficacy scale, the Parental Self-Efficacy with Eczema Care Index (PASECI). Each scale was presented in a single self-administered questionnaire, to measure self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and self-reported task performance related to managing child atopic dermatitis. Each was tested with a community sample of parents of children with atopic dermatitis, and psychometric evaluation of the scales’ reliability and validity was conducted.

Setting and participants
A community-based convenience sample of 120 parents of children with atopic dermatitis completed the self-administered questionnaire. Participants were recruited through schools across Australia.

Results
Satisfactory internal consistency and test–retest reliability was demonstrated for all three scales. Construct validity was satisfactory, with positive relationships between self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis and general perceived self-efficacy; self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis and self-reported task performance; and self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis and outcome expectations. Factor analyses revealed two-factor structures for PEMS and PASECI alike, with both scales containing factors related to performing routine management tasks, and managing the child's symptoms and behaviour. Factor analysis was also applied to POEEMS resulting in a three-factor structure. Factors relating to independent management of atopic dermatitis by the parent, involving healthcare professionals in management, and involving the child in the management of atopic dermatitis were found. Parents’ self-efficacy and outcome expectations had a significant influence on self-reported task performance.

Conclusions
Findings suggest that PEMS and POEEMS are valid and reliable instruments worthy of further psychometric evaluation. Likewise, validity and reliability of PASECI was confirmed.
Keyword Chronic disease management
Atopic dermatitis
Eczema
Outcome expectations
Parenting
Self efficacy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 24 Mar 2015, 09:47:32 EST by Amy Mitchell on behalf of School of Psychology