Sailing to Colchis: war-gods in the Argonautica

Brennan, Adam (2014). Sailing to Colchis: war-gods in the Argonautica. In: Programme: AMPHORAE VIII. Emerging Horizons: Material Culture, Text & Thought in Antiquity. Schedule. AMPHORAE VIII - Emerging Horizons: Material Culture, Text & Thought in Antiquity, Parkville, VIC, Australia, (8-9). 26-28 November, 2014.

Author Brennan, Adam
Title of paper Sailing to Colchis: war-gods in the Argonautica
Conference name AMPHORAE VIII - Emerging Horizons: Material Culture, Text & Thought in Antiquity
Conference location Parkville, VIC, Australia
Conference dates 26-28 November, 2014
Convener University of Melbourne
Proceedings title Programme: AMPHORAE VIII. Emerging Horizons: Material Culture, Text & Thought in Antiquity. Schedule
Place of Publication Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Publisher University of Melbourne
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Published abstract
Open Access Status
Start page 8
End page 9
Total pages 2
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Heroic quests and great deeds are the bread and butter of Greek myth, with stories of Herakles and the Hydra, Theseus and the Minotaur, or Perseus and Medusa. The heroic sea-journey of the Argo and the eponymous Argonauts is another, seen in the Argonautica. Each of these stories requires a villain, or failing that an obstacle. In the voyage of the Argo this role is taken by the Colchians and, through them, the god to whom they pay tribute: the war-deity Ares. Their patron and the protector of the Golden Fleece, Ares’ presence is as a barbaric god for a barbaric people, and he has strong ties to many non-Hellenic tribes encountered throughout the journey. However, his role is complicated when he is equivocated with the Argonauts, when he is employed as an archetype, or as he stands behind the action in concert with the other Olympians. This paper seeks to demonstrate that within the Argonautica, Ares serves a vital role both against and with the Argonauts, carrying his development in the Classical period and earlier Homeric epic through to the views of the Hellenistic era.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
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Created: Thu, 19 Mar 2015, 14:49:58 EST by Jon Swabey on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry