Bury me deep down below: masculine sentimentality on the turn-of-the-century Australian frontier

Bellanta, Melissa (2014) Bury me deep down below: masculine sentimentality on the turn-of-the-century Australian frontier. Outskirts: Feminisms Along the Edge, 31 1-11.

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Author Bellanta, Melissa
Title Bury me deep down below: masculine sentimentality on the turn-of-the-century Australian frontier
Journal name Outskirts: Feminisms Along the Edge   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1445-0445
Publication date 2014-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 31
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Editor Alison Bartlett
Place of publication Crawley, WA, Australia
Publisher Centre for Women's Studies, University of Western Australia
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The idea of a ‘feminisation of sentimentality’ taking place over the long nineteenth century has a long currency in Anglophone scholarship. Many historians of masculinity have indeed argued that white masculinity was defined in opposition to sentimentality by the turn of the twentieth century: as sexually aggressive, militaristic, racially competitive, and characterised by a lack of sympathy for ‘blacks’. White men certainly did use an anti-sentimental rhetoric to ridicule women and their political adversaries in this period. We can see this in turn-of-the-century Australia, where conservative settlers often juxtaposed masculine practicality and effeminate sentimentality in debates over the treatment of Aborigines. In this article, I challenge this rhetoric by showing that rugged white men engaged in many forms of sentimentality in this period. A key Australian example of this was the ‘dying bushman’ tradition. It made the suffering of rugged white men into a source of pathos. It also ensured that frontier violence and tender masculine feeling were interrelated, giving the lie to the notion of a ‘feminisation of sentimentality’.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
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Created: Thu, 19 Mar 2015, 10:38:51 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry